Conservation projects

Wild dog conservation

On the 1st of May 2015, marked an exciting and significant day for wild dog conservation in the KwaZulu-Natal region, as well as for the history of the Manyoni Private Game Reserve (MPGR), with the introduction of the first pack of African wild dogs. The MPGR is the 10th wild dog meta-population site in South Africa, and the Zululand Conservation Trust are actively putting funds towards the monitoring and welfare of this pack of endangered wild dogs.

The wild dogs (2 males & 4 females), were first brought onto the MPGR in December 2014, where they were placed into a holding enclosure (boma) to allow them time to adapt to their new environment. The bond they formed with one another over those crucial months until release was vital for their successful introduction into the Reserve, as well as ensuring the pack does not fragment in the future.

The wild dogs (2 males & 4 females), were first brought onto the MPGR in December 2014, where they were placed into a holding enclosure (boma) to allow them time to adapt to their new environment. The bond they formed with one another over those crucial months until release was vital for their successful introduction into the Reserve, as well as ensuring the pack does not fragment in the future.

Classified as endangered, and with only 39 distinct sub-populations, the re-introduction and protection of these wild dogs is of great importance to the MPGR. Wild dogs can disperse over hundreds of kilometres and with this comes their increased contact with people and domestic animals. This often leads to human-wildlife conflict, as well as the transmission of infectious disease. The natural habitat of African wild dogs is becoming increasingly fragmented due to an increase in land development and a limited number of remaining protected areas in which these populations can thrive. It is therefore vital that protected areas such as the Manyoni Private Game Reserve provide the space to protect this endangered species.

The Zululand Conservation Trust strives to conserve endangered animals and so with the help of a generous sponsorship from Illovo we were able to utilise these funds to support many wild dog related projects such as;

  • The removal of a snare which was attached to the lower body of the Alpha female – this took a great deal of time and patience.
  • The darting and veterinary costs incurred during field work where blood tests were taken to determine if there was an out-break of canine distemper.
  • The purchasing of 2 new VHF and radio collars which were be fitted in January 2018 to replace old collars in order to help the monitoring team gain better signal whilst tracking the dogs.
  • The darting and veterinary costs to fit the collars.
  • The diesel allocation for the Wild dog monitoring team.

To Assist us with continuing our Wild dog work please email info@zululandconservationtrust.org

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